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Well, this universal “truth” was debunked when we found a bunch of amps with transformers made by the Better Coil and Transformers company.

Fender began producing instruments in its Ensenada, Mexico, factory in 1990.

So, obviously a neck date, while being helpful in providing a date range of production, it cannot be a definitive reference.

Unlike the auto industry which has specific model years for their products, most specifications for a given Fender instrument model, change little if any, through the lifetime of the model.

The neck date simply refers to the date that the individual component was produced.

Given the modular nature of Fender's production techniques, an individual neck may have been produced in a given year, placed in the manufacturing warehouse and remained in stock for a period of time, and then subsequently paired with a body to create a complete guitar in the following year.

Other things to look for include chasses placed in cabinets from a different year, “doctored” tube charts, non-original control plates (usually reproductions) on silverface amps, original transformer bell ends (they have correct date codes, of course) on non-original transformers, and non-original knobs (either repro or silverface knobs on blackface amps).unusual things can be found such as the empty “Pulse Adjust” hole on the rear of early ’60 brown amps, the “middle” volume control, use of tweed style grill cloth, strange non-documented transitional circuits, and changes in tolex color including the super-rare cream colored “brown” tolex that is found on some late ’60 amps. Given that people may refer to this information seeking specific production quantities of amps they are curious about, it should be pointed out that the serial numbers apply to chassis types, and not specifically to amplifier models.

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A 1957 tweed Vibrolux was reported with a tube chart printed with circuit “5E3” (tweed Deluxe) instead of the correct 5F11 (see photo).

This new scheme uses the letters MX as a prefix to designate an instrument made in Mexico, followed by an eight-digit number.

Instruments made between 19 carry “MN” prefix serial numbers, with the “M” designating Mexico and the “N” designating the 1990s.

Only the seven-digit suffixes were actually entered into the database.

These serial numbers did not identify the country of origin in the body of the number.

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